2010-02-11 / Columns

Looking Back

125 YEARS AGO

 

St. Ignace News

February 10, 1885

The present cheap rates of travel to and from the old country should be taken advantage of quick, which are as follows: From St. Ignace to Liverpool Queenstown, London, Glasgow, Hamburg and Bremen, $32.05; from all the above mentioned points, to St. Ignace, $18.80. For tickets and full particulars call at the bank of W. A. Burt & Co.

•••

One of the Mackinaw Lumber Co's horses backed into a water hole in the ice yesterday near the mill dock and was drowned.

•••

Notwithstanding the blizzard of last night quite a few turned out to the fire meeting. A committee was appointed to draft a constitution and set by-laws. The meeting adjourned until Thursday evening when it is hoped that every property owner in the city will turn out. St. Ignace will be visited by fire sooner or later, and if it once gets started in the business portion of the city, nearly every business place would go, unless there was a company or two that could be controlled with some sort of discipline. It is only by the merest chance that we have escaped so far and it is time now that something should be done. The city has purchased a good chemical engine and a hook and ladder truck and it seems as though our citizens ought to have enterprise enough to organize companies to use them.

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A number of our young people talk of taking in the op of the "Tiptoe" club at the Island to-morrow night.

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Our esteemed townsman, Eugene Daly, is the latest entry in the race for the St. Ignace postoffice. He is circulating a petition around town and the boys are having an unlimited amount of fun over it. Eugene says he is as smart as any of them and that if he can't run the postoffice in shape nobody can. As an instance of his ability he says he can tell a five dollar bill in a letter every time, which is more than Dolan, Todd, Warren or Hall can do. . . . As far as the News is concerned, we have known Mr. Daly for a number of years and know him to be a thorough business man, and one whose word is as good as his oath. Some anxious persons might say that neither his word or oath are good for much, but "Owen” passes such things over in dignified silence, disdaining to notice them as beneath him.

125 YEARS AGO

St. Ignace News

February 13, 1885

Several persons were seriously frostbitten crossing the Straits this week. Sam Clark, a driver, who in the summer season acts as a cook on steamer, froze his ears badly one day, and his feet the next.

•••

The last carnival at the rink was very largely attended. Some Island people were present; also, a number from Cheboygan. There was a large number masked and all enjoyed themselves immensely.

••• An honest looking fellow called at our office yesterday, wishing to be directed to where he might get a few day's work. Several parts of his body were frost-bitten having just arrived in town from the Sault, walking the entire distance without food.

•••

Another fraud is being worked upon the unsuspecting. Young men visit residences when they expect male members of the family absent. They gain admission by informing the inmates that they are "inspectors of lamps," and demand a fee for each lamp. It is hard to believe that any are so gullible as to be taken in by such a transparent swindle; but people who consider it economy not to take a newspaper are simple enough to swallow anything.

••• Our "patent" four pages not having arrived, we will have to disappoint our readers with only four pages this issue.

•••

The day express was taken off from the D., M. & M. R. R. Monday, so that now there is only one train per day between this city and Marquette.

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There is a gray colored cow running the streets, which is a nuisance to everybody. No sooner is a barn or stable door opened than she is into it. There is talk to the effect that the owner of the cow will be prosecuted.

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Two Swedes walked down from Moran yesterday. They put up at Charley Raymond's, where the dis- covery was made that one of them had frozen all the toes on both feet. Dr. Steinbrecher fears amputation will be necessary.

•••

Chas. Bradshaw left his sleigh and load out in the middle of the Straits last Tuesday night, it being so very cold that he found it impossible to proceed further. He froze one of his feet very badly and others with him met as bad a fate and some worse.

•••

Capt. Michael McCarty, for years in charge of the tug Saugatuck, died at his home on the Island last Tuesday about 11 o'clock p.m.

80 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace Enterprise

February 13, 1930

Gloria Swanson in what is said to be the greatest of all talking pictures "The Trespasser," will be at the St. Ignace Theatre Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of next week.

The attraction for Sunday and Monday will be a Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer picture, "Wonder of Women," an all talking picture of modern times.

"The Trespasser," 100 per cent talking and singing production, is notable in that its story is laid almost entirely in Chicago, yet it has nothing whatever to do with racketeers, gunmen or other figures of crime, a refreshing departure from the succession of Chicago underworld themes. As directed by Edmund Goulding, the author, this new opus reflects the heartbeats of life in Chicago's upper social circles and is declared to be one of the most naturally presented dramas of modern interest yet prepared for the talking screen.

••• The Enterprise sincerely trusts that the Parent-Teachers' Association, working in conjunction with the Board of Education, will find ways and means to finance the proposed addition to the LaSalle for a gymnasium and auditorium. No improvement in the city is more badly needed as noted the inactivity of sports during the winter. The skating rink offers the only outdoor amusement and there is no place in the town where the pupils of the school can congregate for an evening of athletic pleasure. The movement to secure such a place should receive the support and backing of every red blooded citizen of this community.

•••

Ten fish weighing 110 pounds is John Plaunt's record for two day's spearing in the straits last week. John is of the opinion that this is a record and would like to hear from other fishermen.

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From Mackinac Island: Isaac Paquin has resigned as mail carrier and Frank Valier has been driving the route temporarily.

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From Allenville: The Brevort township school board met last Monday night for the purpose of opening bids for the big new school house at Moran. There were only two bids submitted, all the other contractors saying the school was too costly for the size of the place and were fair minded enough not to submit bids. The board would not tell up how much the bids were that came in, but they promptly turned them down, and will hold another meeting Tuesday night to receive some private bids from outside concerns.

•••

From Rexton: This is the last week of the sixth month of school as the Rexton school closes on May 9th, having had nine months of school at that time.

••• From Cedarville: Floyd Weston and George Hamel left last Friday for Brimley, where they will engage in the fishing business.

50 YEARS AGO

The Republican-News

and St. Ignace Enterprise

February 11, 1960

The barge, Beaver, broke ice for 18 hours to fight its way into the Barrett dock at St. Ignace at 1:30 p.m. Sunday.

Carried as super-cargo from Mackinac Island was the architect of the Moral Re-Armament TV film studio, Edwin Cromwell, who was returning to his office at Little Rock, Arkansas.

The Beaver, which had previously been in dock at the Island for five days without breaking ice, made the first six miles between Mackinac Island and the railway ferry dock at St. Ignace in seven and one-half hours on Saturday. The last mile and a half through the thicker ice of Moran bay required an additional ten and a half hours on Sunday.

•••

Five townships in Mackinac county are establishing liquor inspection departments in order to qualify for return of state liquor license funds.

A new state law requires that the townships establish such a department which is to be financed by the fees received from liquor licenses issued in the township.

St. Ignace township will receive the largest amount of the four units of government, $1,400. Other townships who are qualifying for the return of the fees are: Hendricks, $850; Hudson, $700; Moran, $600; Brevort, $600.

•••

TV stations at the Soo and Cheboygan will start a 16-week series of film presentations telling the problems, aims and achievements of American education.

••• Two Kincheloe Air Force pilots made an emergency helicopter flight to Mackinac Island Tuesday night of last week that was credited with saving the life of a 2-1/2-year old boy.

Little Charles Drysdale was flown from the ice-bound island in the Straits of Mackinac to Little Traverse hospital in Petoskey, where physicians performed emergency abdominal surgery around midnight. Attendants reported his condition as satisfactory.

Dr. Joseph Solomon . . . ordered the helicopter.

•••

At least a century before white men even dreamed of fishing through the ice, American Indians were hauling winter-caught lake trout to the shores of Michigan's Mackinac Straits in dog sleds. And the tip-ups used by today's ice-fishermen are modern counterparts of the bent twigs used by [them].

Modern ice-fishing, through, actually made its first appearance in Michigan in the early 1900's when a group of immigrant Russian sugar beet workers introduced their version of the sport in the Saginaw Bay area, using homemade lures and horsehair lines, according to the Michigan Tourist Council.

Yet, as it's practiced today, this winter sport had its real start in the early '30s when a few dyed-in-thebait can sportsmen in southwestern Michigan discovered they could catch bluegills through the ice. The word soon spread and ice-fishing caught on. It has been booming ever since. Now the sport numbers its followers in the hundred thousands in Michigan. It has become one of the state's major winter attractions and an important source of travel revenue.

At St. Ignace, about 100 shanties dot the bay ice. On Sunday, most were occupied throughout the day and it was reported that the nearer shore locations were providing some good catches of good sized perch.

30 YEARS AGO The St. Ignace News

The Weekly Wave

February 14, 1980

The historic Grondin family log cabin in St. Ignace has been donated to the Michilimackinac Historical Society to preserve it as a part of the rich local history.

The vacant log cabin which is on the corner of Boulton Street and North State Street was recently given to the historical society by the children of Mrs. Earl "Grandma" Peterson, the owner and former St. Ignace resident. Mrs. Peterson now lives in a Flushing-area nursing home.

•••

Board members of the Mackinac Straits Hospital, happy over strong backing by residents in their passing the millage proposal of 1- 1/2 mills by nearly 3 to 1, set up several actions to improve the financial structure and to improve community relations with the hospital.

A committee of three, Lawrence Rubin, Ethel Hayward and Administrator John Tobin, was named to answer questions from individuals. And any questions which are of general interest will be given for public use to the newspaper.

•••

There will be a Congressional Hearing on the promulgation of rules by the Secretary of the Interior to govern Indian fishing Wednesday, February 20, in Sault Ste Marie.

•••

The Community Center (Multipurpose Neighborhood Facility and Senior Center) at the County Airport is complete except for an air exchanger in the kitchen and a step-up of heating by requiring installation of more fans on the heating pipes, reported Ron Calery, executive director of the EUP Community Action Agency. The [county] board approved a 20-year lease agreement.

•••

From Mackinaw City: There was standing room only at the regular Village Council meeting on Thursday, February 7. Gerry Harsh of Land Planning & Design Assoc., from Lansing, brought copies of the Waterfront Development plans and presented these to the council and suggested ways in which the project could be financed gradually.

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From Mackinac Island: Two public hearings are set on February 22 at the Island, one at 11 a.m. for the State Park, an the other at 1 p.m. for the City.

The State Park hearing will be at the Soldiers' Barracks at the fort to amend the State Park rules to increase the number of livery carriages to be licensed.

The city hearing will be in the Medical Center Basement, to discuss a request from Carriage Tours to rezone the property up the hill from the present Tours Barns, know as the old "Doud Farm."

The carriage Tours plan is to use the area for a Surrey Hill building and area, where tour carriage passengers will be allowed to browse through the museum they plan to install there.

•••

Festivities for the Les Cheneaux Winter Carnival will begin Friday night with the annual snowmobile safari, which begins at the Hessel Pier and ends with a hot dog roast at Cedarville. Saturday and Sunday will be filled with games and fun.

•••

On Monday of this week between 35 and 40 teachers and support personal representing the MEA and MESPA (Michigan Education Supporting Personnel Association) went out on strike in the Pickford School District as months of relatively fruitless negotiations culminated in strike action.

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