2010-12-30 / Columns

Looking Back

120 YEARS AGO The St. Ignace News December 27, 1890

Frank S. Walker is putting in water connections at his residence.

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Frank Cravens came in from the woods and spent Christmas with his parents.

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The Point AuChene gypsum beds are to be worked next season, sure. It is also thought that operations will be begun on St. Martin's Island.

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There being no sleighing, Christmas passed away very quietly. The various church entertainments and Christmas trees the evening previous were all well attended.

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To-day's snow storm gives us good sleighing and it looks as if it had come to stay.

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Two of the four Gould City women, convicted last Saturday, were taken to Marquette prison on Monday by Sheriff Metevier; the other two found friends who paid their fines and were released.

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There is a gentlemen in the city at present, who represents a large woolen goods manufactory, of Edinborough, Scotland, who is looking for a location to start a branch establishment. He is favorably impressed with our city, and has written his firm to that effect. He says the location is just right and shipping facilities satisfactory. The News will have more to say on this subject.

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There is a law which goes into effect January 1st which requires all freight cars in this state to be provided with some sort of safety couplers, and Commissioner Rich has notified the companies about it.

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The Atlantic steamship lines have determined to put a stop to ocean racing, and the excitement of beating the record will no longer be one of the pleasures of the steamship traveler. It is doubtless just as well that this crazy amusement has come to an end. It is true that no accidents have resulted from it, but it involved extra risks, and the cautious traveler will hereafter feel a greater sense of safety, while the reckless tourist, to whom it has been a new delight, can find a compensation for its loss -- perhaps, in gaining an additional day or two of poker and champagne?

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The str. St. Ignace did not cross the straits Tuesday night, owing to bad weather.

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Jos. Belfry, late of the M. C. R. R. freight office, Mackinaw City, intends going to Texas or Colorado soon.

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Geo. H. Hauptli resigned his position in Brooks' shoe store last week, to go into the freight office at the Merchandise dock.

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The many friends of J. H. Ford and wife, who moved to Mackinaw City several months ago, will be glad to learn that they have returned to St. Ignace to reside. Mr. Ford fills an important position in the freight office at the Merchandise dock.

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From the Moran School: “School Days,” By Agnes M. Roggenbuck, aged 12 years.

Some people tell us that these are our happiest days. Of course I like to come to school because I really want to have a good education. I have eight studies, but I think arithmetic is the hardest of all. History is a pleasant study, but it is so hard to remember the names of those great generals, who took part in the civil war, neither can I remember very much about the great battles; but it seems to me that the battle of Ball's Bluff was the most sorrowful. I shall try to tell you something about it. Aparty of 2,000 Federals crossed the Potomac River at Ball Bluff. They were attacked and forced down slippery clayey bluff fifty to one hundred and fifty feet high, to the river below where, in trying to escape, many were drowned, some were shot and scarcely half their number reached the other bank. I think it was so cruel to shoot the poor fellows when they were trying to save their lives by swimming to the other shore. But war is a dreadful cruel way of deciding a disputed question.

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Michigan is now taking care of 3,200 insane people, and it is some satisfaction to know that the per cent of us getting crazy is as small as any state in the Union.

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“Oh! That is lovely,” is what people said of the arbor and decorations at the M. E. church, this Christmas. The Epworth League did the work and that society may rest assured that satisfaction was given to all concerned. The church never looked so nice as on Christmas Eve.

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James Ketchum, merchant, of Les Cheneaux, brought over a load of baskets and mittens the first of the week and after disposing of the same returned with a load of merchandise for the store of Wood & Ketchum. He reports business good and growing better all the time.

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Jos. Quinn sold his splendid team of horses to James Gugan, of Les Cheneaux, this week, for $550.00. He at the same time engaged with Mr. Gugan to drive the team for him until April 1st next.

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Stellwagen & Kynoch are making two 80-barrel and one 20-barrel galvanized iron tanks, for a Grand Rapids party, for use on Mackinac Island. They will have them ready for delivery by the time the ice road to the Island is safe.

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Abeautiful heavily plated silver collecting plate was presented by the Daughters of the Good Shepherd to the church on Xmas Day, and was used at the Xmas services. It bears the inscription: “Presented by the Daughters of the Good Shepherd, 1890.”

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The best thing to give your enemy is forgiveness; to an opponent, tolerance; to a friend, your heart; to a child, good example; to your father, deference; to your mother, conduct that will make her proud of you; to yourself, respect, and to all men, charity.

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We have not heard a single business man complain of his holiday trade this season. All who put in stocks and reached out for trade by liberal advertising, were duly rewarded by good patronage. In fact many of our merchants done far better than expected.

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A very handsome rocking chair was seen in the “arbor” at the M. E. church on Christmas Eve. It was for Rev. Jas. Pascoe and was the gift of his Sunday School class.

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Dan. W. English, our popular merchant tailor, went up the line Wednesday morning, loaded down with clothing for his customers. He returned the same evening.

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Miss Ella Ruttenber, teacher of the Epoufette school, is spending her holidays with friends in this city.

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Died. -- In Boston, Mass., at the home of his mother, on Friday last, James Power, half brother to Thomas Dolan, of this city. Deceased was a very popular young man and his many friends and acquaintances in this city and vicinity will learn of his death with sincere regret. Mr. and Mrs. Dolan left for Boston Sunday evening and are expected home next week, accompanied by Mr. Dolan's mother.

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Evangelist Moody spent Monday in the city. He was on his way to Detroit to spend the holidays with his family, after which he will return to the u. p. and resume Evangelistic work.

80 YEARS AGO The St. Ignace Enterprise December 25, 1930

During the hunting season William Anguilm, the general proprietor of the Rexton hotel, was in his bath room shaving. It was still dark, and out of the calm of early morning, came a disturbing noise from his poultry shed. Now Mr. Anguilm is an extensive raiser of turkeys, geese and chickens, and fearing thieves or skunks he rushed down, clad only in his slippers, underwear and bathrobe, to investigate the cause of the commotion. As he entered the outer enclosure of the poultry yard, he heard a loud snort and soon came face to face with the cause. He saw not a skunk -- a big buck with magnificent antlers.

Mr. Anguilm stood his ground and as the buck charged he grasped the horns and “bulldogged” the animal, practicing a feat he learned on the cattle ranches of the west. After getting the buck down, the hotel man sat on his head and neck. Resting a while to get his third or fourth wind, Mr. Anguilm started wondering what he should do next. He suddenly realized that he had slipped his razor in his bathrobe pocket when he left the house, and he quietly released one hand to see if it was still there. It was. He flipped open the blade and slashed the buck's throat, watched long enough to see that his assailant was really dead, and went back into the house to resume his shaving.

Now Bill says he would rather meet a buck at short range than a skunk anyhow. Of course his battle was a catch at weights, and neither one was required to weigh in at 3 p.m. At that Bill out-weighed the buck by 30 pounds. The deer weighed only 238.

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The news dispatches of this week carry the information of the promotion of Commander Aubrey W. Fitch, U. S. N., now in command of the U. S. Wright, flagship of the fleet scouting off Hampton Roads to that of captain. Many of the old timers will recall Captain Fitch as a resident of St. Ignace some 30 years ago when his father was superintendent of the South Shore here and whom Fitch street was named after. The old Fitch home (the old Conner place) still stands. Young Fitch was a graduate of LaSalle school. Attorney Edward McNamara, whose family was a neighbor to that of Fitch, was a chum of the navy captain and recalls many of the pranks the two indulged in as youngsters.

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A wire from Cleveland gives the information that South Shore enginemen are included in the group working shorter hours to give employment to idle brothers. The dispatch says:

Voluntary reduction of monthly mileage to give job to idle fellow workmen has been partially effected by members of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, presidents of the two organizations announced today.

The reduction of mileage reduces the wages of those sharing their jobs with the unemployed, for payment is on a monthly mileage basis, the announcement said ,adding that it will cost the roads nothing.

Arthur F. Whitney, president of the trainmen, said the plan of his organization is now in operation on the Central of George, Chicago and Great Western, Big Four, Detroit and Toledo, South Shore line, Soo line, Lackawanna and Wyoming valley, Boston and Main, Buffalo Rochester and Pittsburgh, Bessemer and Lake Erie, Chicago, Indianapolis and Louisville and the Reading.

Negotiations are underway, Whitney said, to extend the plan to all the railroads of the country. Even if adopted on all roads, he said, it would not care for all of the 40,000 unemployed trainmen. This brotherhood has a membership of 18,000.

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The City schools were dismissed Tuesday for the holiday period and will reopen Tuesday, January 5th. LaSalle's closing was featured by a delightful and well rendered program by the children of grades 1 to 6 inclusive in the new auditorium Monday evening. The First ward school Miss Sorenson's pupils, gave an enjoyable program Tuesday afternoon, while at the same hour the Third ward was closing with a most excellent program in Mr. Dettman's room. The closing exercises in all of the schools were largely attended by parents and friends.

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Supt. Tower of the state ferry says the state boats will continue to run as long as conditions permit - all winter if necessary.

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The Old Folks and the American Legion, occupying the second floor of the Hoban block, have been obliged to secure other quarters as the room is needed by the owner of the building. The Old Folks will have the use of Masonic hall for their parties while the Legion will have rooms in the city hall.

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Postmaster Seward is authority for the statement that both letter and package postal business is in advance of last year, notwithstanding the depression. Rather surprising.

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The program in connection with the municipal Christmas tree, which is sponsored by the Lions Club, will take place at 4:00 o'clock this (Christmas) afternoon. The band will play and there will be singing and other features. Each child present will receive a bag of candy. The tree, which is located in Railroad park, is a magnificent specimen of the evergreen variety, lighted by a myriad of colored electric lamps, all tending to inform the world that the Christmas spirit is alive in St. Ignace and that Peace and Good Will reigns here.

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From Mackinac Island: Barney Lasley has hauled the launch Anna upon the Shore opposite the postoffice. The John B. Lyman is also hauled up there.

Carl Couchois and Orville Steel came Saturday from Bois Blanc and will remain over the holidays.

The boys basket ball teams have been holding practice in the hall at the Fort.

Herbert Winfield, assistant keeper at Crisp Point Light station arrived home Tuesday.

Round Island Light station was closed on Monday morning, the 15th. There had been no boats passing through for several days. The tug Durocher and scow were about the last to pass. Capt. J. W. Taylor went to Mackinaw City where he and his wife will spend the winter. Assistant Charles Henry went to his home.

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The morning train from the east yesterday was in two sections. A holiday special with five Pullmans went through early in the morning, the regular coming in about on schedule.

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From Cedarville: Among the students and teachers who are home for their holiday vacation are Raymond and Janetta Shoberg, Lydia Dunn Irene Visnaw, Doris Beach, Angeline Anderson, William A. Smale, Jr., and Stewart White.

Rev. Wm. Low of the Pickford M. E. church is to hold services in Cedarville Union church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

Several couples from here attended the dance at the Junction Saturday evening.

E. C. Rudd and son, Junior were in Detroit the first of the week.

Seven of the children in the intermediate room have had their teeth taken care of since the school nurse was here.

50 YEARS AGO The Republican-News and St. Ignace Enterprise December 29, 1960

Building construction and alterations during 1960 reached a figure only one-half as high as during 1959, according to cost estimates on building permits issued by the common council.

Motels, a restaurant and several large new homes accounted for the largest portion of the building completed or underway this year.

The total estimated cost of construction for the year is $326,050.

In 1959, construction authorized was cost estimated at $682,545. Of this amount, nearly half, or $300,000 was accounted for by the jet fuel tank installation expansion.

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The Knights of Columbus of St. Ignace will sponsor a teen-age dance December 30 at the K. C. hall in cooperation with Local No. 593, American Federation of Musicians.

Dan Gallagher, Grand Knight of the St. Ignace council, stated that this will be the final activity in 1960 in assisting in providing activities for the youth of this community.

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All merchants in the St. Ignace area are urged to attend or be represented at a special meeting to be held in the St. Ignace city hall, council chamber, Wednesday, January 4 at 10:00 a.m. Two methods of figuring the sales tax will be discussed so that a uniform system will be adopted by the area. The methods are the modified California schedule and the mathematically accurate schedule.

Also at the meeting, another topic will be brought up, that of the winter store hours.

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Wednesday evening of last week, St. Ignace Lodge No. 369, F. and A. M. held its annual election.

Officers for the coming ear are: Worshipful Master, John Schimmelpenny; Senior Warden, Earnest Krause; Junior Warden, Robert Litzner; Secretary, Milford Mattison; Treasurer, James Erskine; Senior Deacon, Patrick McCarry; Junior Deacon, James McMillan; Stewards, W. Luepnitz, Ray Christensen, Herbert Lavine, Frank Bigelow; Chaplain, Charles Garries; Tyler, Alton Conrad; Organist, Don Riley; Marshall, Don Densmore. Masonic Association: Don McEachern, Kress Reavie, T. L. Jackson and Charles Garries.

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The First National Bank was awarded the Civic League trophy for the best decorated business place during the Christmas season. The displays at the LaSalle Elementary school and the Methodist church were close seconds in the voting, and were accorded honorable mention.

Among the homes, that of Charles Fair on Marley street, won the first place. Second place was shared by three: Jack Ryerse on Truckey street, Dr. L.. C. Shaftoe on Goudreau, and James Massaway on McCann. Third place was given to the home of Mrs. Dorothy LaRoque on Portage Street.

The voting was conducted last Thursday evening at the library. A group of interested people toured the city in a cavalcade led by Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Ossmann, after which they returned to the Library to vote and visit over coffee and donuts served by Mrs. Lydia Conlogue and Mrs. Richard Stoll of the Civic League.

Among the other beautifully decorated homes in the city, the following figured in the voting, and were accorded honorable mention: Maurice Wood, James Fitzpatrick, Junior McGregor, Charles Rhoades, Joseph Vairo, Robert Morin and George Malnar.

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