2017-03-16 / News

Powwow Honors Great Lakes Waters, Includes Traditional Music and Dancing



One of the ceremonies during the powwow was one honoring military veterans. Drum groups played a song for the veterans, while people stood to honor them as they danced. Veterans began dancing by themselves, and then the public was welcomed to join them in the dance, many taking the time to shake the veterans’ hands and offer thanks for their service. One of the ceremonies during the powwow was one honoring military veterans. Drum groups played a song for the veterans, while people stood to honor them as they danced. Veterans began dancing by themselves, and then the public was welcomed to join them in the dance, many taking the time to shake the veterans’ hands and offer thanks for their service.

Above: Multiple drum groups provided the music for dancing at this past weekend’s powwow, held Saturday, March 11, and Sunday March 12, at the Kewadin Shores Casino event tent. Pictured here are drummers (clockwise, from left): Darrell Kingbird, Cole Kingbird, Steve Fleagle, Henry Lewis, and John Hutchinson. Above: Multiple drum groups provided the music for dancing at this past weekend’s powwow, held Saturday, March 11, and Sunday March 12, at the Kewadin Shores Casino event tent. Pictured here are drummers (clockwise, from left): Darrell Kingbird, Cole Kingbird, Steve Fleagle, Henry Lewis, and John Hutchinson.

At left: Elizabeth Pigeon was the female lead dancer during the Honoring Our Waters and Her Protectors Powwow and Round Dance held in the tent at the Kewadin Shores Casino Events Center Sunday, March 12. The powwow was held to bring attention to the need to protect the earth’s waters. Several vendors and information booths were available to participants. Booths featured information on Enbridge Energy’s Line 5 pipeline, the Women’s March of Michigan, as well as several vendors selling Native American art, jewelry, and more. At left: Elizabeth Pigeon was the female lead dancer during the Honoring Our Waters and Her Protectors Powwow and Round Dance held in the tent at the Kewadin Shores Casino Events Center Sunday, March 12. The powwow was held to bring attention to the need to protect the earth’s waters. Several vendors and information booths were available to participants. Booths featured information on Enbridge Energy’s Line 5 pipeline, the Women’s March of Michigan, as well as several vendors selling Native American art, jewelry, and more.

At left: Todd Brewer of Traverse City took part in the festivities during the Honoring Our Waters and Her Protectors Powwow and Round Dance Saturday, March 11, and Sunday, March 12. Mr. Brewer is a member of the Lakota Nation, one of seven related Sioux tribes. At left: Todd Brewer of Traverse City took part in the festivities during the Honoring Our Waters and Her Protectors Powwow and Round Dance Saturday, March 11, and Sunday, March 12. Mr. Brewer is a member of the Lakota Nation, one of seven related Sioux tribes.

Male lead dancer Marcus Winchester leads a dance during the powwow at the Kewadin Shores Casino Events Center Sunday, March 12. Mr. Winchester is from Niles, and is a member of the Pottawatomie tribe. This was Mr. Winchester’s first time in St. Ignace. Male lead dancer Marcus Winchester leads a dance during the powwow at the Kewadin Shores Casino Events Center Sunday, March 12. Mr. Winchester is from Niles, and is a member of the Pottawatomie tribe. This was Mr. Winchester’s first time in St. Ignace.

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